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7 must-see landscaping & gardening projects from around the world

7 must-see landscaping & gardening projects from around the world

Turning a garden of the imagination into a physical reality takes time, planning and patience. Landscaping and gardening is a unique architectural skill – one we are keen to celebrate on WorldBuild365. Here are seven stunning examples of gardening and landscaping from around the globe.


Some are large; some are small; some radically change our perceptions of what a garden or park can be. Read on to see more. 


Gardens by the Bay – Grant Associates & Wilkinson Eyre – Singapore


Image: Shutterstock


This 100-acre park on Singapore’s seafront combines monumental man-made edifices with peerless landscaping from Britain’s Grant Associates. A cornucopia of themed gardens, tree-lined walkways and event spaces affords visitors a green-tinged vision of luscious tranquillity.


Gardens by the Bay, Singapore


Gardens by the Bay, SingaporeImages: Shutterstock


Eighteen 50-metre tall artificial trees dominate the park’s skyline. Each houses rainwater tanks that cool themselves while also pumping water to the massive greenhouses located in the park. Wilkinson Eyre’s greenhouses feature a number of plants not-native to Singapore. Combining stunning sculptural landscapes with easy visitor flow and unique structures, this is one garden that must be visited in person.


Gardens by the Bay, SingaporeImage: Shutterstock



Novartis Campus Physic Garden - Thorbjörn Andersson & Sweco Architects – Basel, Switzerland


Novartis Campus Physic GardenImage: © Jan Raeber/Sweco Architects


Inspired by an ancient site where monks would gather to trade knowledge, Thorbjörn Andersson’s Physic Garden is a sensuous feast; a place where mystic scents, changing colours and seasonal variety meet. The garden itself is located at the Basel Headquarters of Swiss healthcare company Novartis.


Novartis Campus Physic GardenImage: © Jan Raeber/Sweco Architects


Image: © Sweco Architects


Andersson’s design was inspired by theatres and labyrinths, creating a multi-layered green space that intrigues as much as it delights. Sunken flower beds are criss-crossed by metal walkways. Each side is flanked by small wood sheds, reminiscent of bookcases, while skirting hedges form the Physic Garden’s final boundaries. An enclosed, yet highly characterful, space has been created by Andersson and Sweco Architects.


Image: © Jan Raeber/Sweco Architects


Sky Garden – SO? Architecture and Ideas – Istanbul, Turkey


Sky Garden, IstanbulImage: © Yerçekim 


When SO? Architecture was commissioned to create a garden for Ortaköy Square, one of Istanbul’s busiest, tourist rich, areas, a challenge presented itself. Putting a garden in such a congested space would reduce its walkable area, making the square more dense. How best to then proceed?


Sky Garden, IstanbulImage: © Yerçekim 


Simple. Hanging baskets. A sturdy, polygonal structure houses numerous hanging baskets that form the Sky Garden. This approach allows for maximum space, but still lets visitors to take in some natural goodness in an urban area. Like a tree with multiple branches, the garden flies between the sky and nearby Bosphorous river with each potted plant. Visitors can also use a pulley system to take a closer look at each plant pot. 


Sky Garden, Istanbul


Image: © Yerçekim  


Paris Zoological Park – Bernard Tschumi Urbanists Architects & Veronique Descharrieres – Paris, France


Paris Zoological ParkImage: © Iwan Baan 


Zoos, particularly those situated in urban areas, often require clever landscaping techniques to provide the illusion of space. Especially if they are anything like Paris Zoological Park. The park holds five “biozones”, replicating the landscapes of Patagonia, Sudanese Sahel, Europe, Guyana and Madagascar. A seamless visitor experience between each zone had to be achieved.


Paris Zoological ParkImage: © Iwan Baan


Veronique Descharrieres and Bernard Tschumi Urbanists employed some neat tricks to create a spacious feel to the park. Topography has been used to move visitors from surprise to surprise without revealing which “biozone” they are headed to next. By creating artificial rolling hillocks, frame views are reduced which gives visitors a sense of greater space, despite the park’s restrictive boundaries. 


Paris Zoological ParkImage: © Iwan Baan


Floating Plane Hidden Garden – McCullough Mulvin Architects – Ranelagh, Co. Dublin, Ireland


Floating Plane Hidden GardenImage: © Ros Kavanagh


There is nothing about a garden that says it must be a massive, open area. Thinking inside the box, almost literally, McCullough Mulvin Architects has created an internal, contemplative space inside a private home in Ranelagh, Ireland. 


Floating Plane Hidden Garden


Floating Plane Hidden GardenImages: © Ros Kavanagh


A calming courtyard, proportioned using the golden ration, brings the outside in. Large windows allow for a near seamless integration between the garden and the rest of the house’s interiors. A single tree stands solitary in the middle of the space. McCullough Mulvin’s design offers a unique approach to residential landscaping by removing external elements and re-contextualising them internally. 


Floating Plane Hidden GardenImage: © Ros Kavanagh


Secret Garden – Olson Kundig Architects – Uijeongbu, South Korea


Secret Garden, KoreaImage: © Kevin Scott


At first glance, this could be any other adventure playground. Look a little deeper though, and you’ll realise the best way to view Olson Kundig’s Secret Garden is from a bird’s perspective. 


Floating Plane Hidden Garden


Floating Plane Hidden GardenImages: © Kevin Scott


This 1,850 square metre garden follows a recent urban landscaping trend of placing green spaces on rooftops. This means architects have to be a touch economical with space. Olson Kundig’s leafy area still manages to squeeze in climbing frames, unique animal statues made from recycled materials, a wading pool, maze and tree houses. This particular garden shows how urban landscaping is changing to match the pace of urbanisation worldwide. 


Floating Plane Hidden GardenImage: © Kevin Scott


Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park – Hargreaves Associates – Stratford, London, United Kingdom


Queen Elizabeth Olympic ParkImage: Shutterstock


Hargreaves Associates’ reworking of former industrial land into a bustling public space is an ideal example of how landscaping can completely revitalise an area. The chiselled hillocks, smooth, clear paths and river-side stretches are all the result of creating a fresh park for the 2012 London Olympic Games. 


Queen Elizabeth Olympic ParkImage: Shutterstock


Rather than wallowing in post-industrial squalor, Hargreaves Associates’ design has breathed new life into this Stratford site. It’s also a testament to sustainability too. Four years on from London 2012, and the park is still in use. Each of the plants will be allowed to flower naturally over the course of their lifetimes. The park, which also houses the Olympic Stadium, will remain a fixture of London life for decades to come.



Image: Shutterstock


If these projects have inspired you, or you are already in the midst of creating a glorious garden, remember to head over to WorldBuild365’s urban design & landscaping product catalogue for items from major global manufacturers.






 

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